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2014 Pyramid Award Winners

Congratulations to these 21 recipients of the 2014 Pyramid Awards!

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Buckner Elementary

Tobie Keown of Buckner Elementary won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Technological Melting Pot". This award will be used to purchase Chromebooks and apps to help special education students in grades K-5 increase engagement while improving reading, writing, expressive language and other academic skills. Each student will receive specially designed instruction that is targeted to improve his/her academic weaknesses. The Chromebooks will also provide daily exposure to receiving, manipulating and expressing information in an electronic format.

Camden Station Elementary

Amy Pierce of Camden Station Elementary won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Engineering is Elementary — And Problem Solving Is, Too!". This award will be used to purchase materials to establish an engineering program to connect the Common Core math standards to social studies and real-world problems. This will help 5th grade special education students who might otherwise find the standards too rigorous to be relevant.

Centerfield Elementary

Christy Weaver of Centerfield Elementary won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Building School Success with Conflict Management and Character Skills". This award will be used to purchase support materials for the Kelso's Choice conflict management skills program. This program is based on the premise that every child is capable of becoming a peacemaker by learning the difference between minor problems they can handle and serious problems that require an adult's help. All K-5 students will be exposed to this new curriculum through classroom guidance, news segments that will be broadcast each morning, assemblies and class meetings with same age peers.

Crestwood Elementary

Lauren Beaty of Crestwood Elementary won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "iSee, iLearn, iReflect". This award will be used to purchase 2 iPads for 4th grade students to independently determine their strengths as learners. Using the video and annotation capabilities of the iPads, students will reflect on their speaking and listening behaviors, in addition to the language arts focus.

Goshen Elementary at Hillcrest

Pam Mann and Melissa Durham of Goshen Elementary at Hillcrest won a Pyramid Award for their proposal "One Book to Connect the World". This award will be used to purchase 3 iPads for 2nd and 3rd grade students to participate in the Global Read Aloud program. This program links students around the world using the communication capabilities of the iPads to improve reading comprehension and strengthen conversational skills.

Jaclyn Harbin and Amy Gaynor of Goshen Elementary at Hillcrest won a Pyramid Award for their proposal "The Science of Suspension: Integrating Civil Engineering and Technology to Develop an Oldham County Bridge". This award will be used to purchase 2 iPads and non-fiction reference material about bridge construction and engineering. Fourth grade students will use these tools to determine the location and cost for a new bridge linking Oldham County and Indiana. They will then design the bridge using an app on the iPads. This project will engage students in math, science and technology.

Stephanie Atkins of Goshen Elementary at Hillcrest won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Reading for Families". This award will be used to create an in-class library of almost 150 books for 1st grade students to take home to read with parents. Having the books in the classroom will allow better matching of books to each student's reading level. Parents will also benefit by understanding their child's reading level and using the books as examples to build their home libraries.

Rachel Turnage of Goshen Elementary at Hillcrest won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Growing Readers". This award will be used to build a library of over 200 non-fiction books for 1st grade students to use to increase their fluency and comprehension. Having multiple copies of each title will allow small groups of students to be reading the same title and encourage discussion. These non-fiction books will also encourage new learning and open students' minds to a new genre.

 

Harmony Elementary

Alison Hafner of Harmony Elementary School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Great Thinkers". This award will be used to purchase two iPads , Tinkertoy sets, KNex Education kits and non-fiction books about inventors and scientists. Resource students in grades 3-5 will use these tools to learn about the world's great thinkers, some of whom struggled themselves to learn as children. Students will be guided to create tools and machines, individually or with a partner. This will provide the opportunity for students to think about problem solving strategies, and also use their hands to create and write about their inventions.

Kim Kinnison of Harmony Elementary School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "An Apple a Day: Life Lessons in Nutrition". This award will be used to purchase an iPad and television to integrate into physical education 5th grade classes. Having dedicated equipment will allow daily nutrition lessons to help students make healthy food choices, and put them on the path toward becoming healthy adults.

 

Kenwood Station Elementary

Whitney Cox of Kenwood Station Elementary School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Social Studies Simulations: A Hands-on Approach to U.S. History". This award will be used to purchase interactive simulation programs to enhance the current curriculum. Students in fifth grade will be introduced to the 5 big ideas in social studies education: geography, culture/society, economics, government/civics, and historical perspective. These hands-on activities will provide students with background knowledge on how our country has changed over time and how in many ways it has stayed the same.

LaGrange Elementary

Rebecca Broughton of LaGrange Elementary School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Technology for Today, Tomorrow and Til' the End of Time!". This award will be used to purchase a laptop computer, software and accessories for use by special education students in grades K-5. This dedicated equipment will be available in a quiet, one-on-one setting where the students can receive direct, specific, repetitive instruction that focuses on their specific needs. While many students of these may be able to work a smartphone or play games on an iPad, they are being left behind when it comes to actual computer skills.

Liberty Elementary

Nicole Robinson of Liberty Elementary School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Read, Read, Read, With Me". This award will be used to purchase take-home kits to increase family engagement with literacy through storytelling. Parents of students in grades K-1 will receive training on how to use these hands-on kits to actively guide their child through the strategic process of reading text, understanding text, and participating in a conversation centered on a deeper level of understanding. An assortment of books, props and activities in each backpack will reinforce the foundational literacy skills taught in the classroom.

Paula Moore of Liberty Elementary School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Growing Student's Self-Leadership Skills Through the 7 Habits of Happy Kids!". This award will be used to purchase books, games and props to implement a program to teach students in grades K-5 a set of life skills popularized by Steven Covey. This program is based on Covey's book The Leader in Me in which he adapts his 7 habits into an approach for school communities. This program can be repeated for years to come with the materials provided by the Pyramid Award.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS

Oldham County Middle

Joe Perceful of Oldham County Middle School won a Pyramid Award for his proposal "Creating a "Mindstorm"". This award will be used to purchase 3 Lego Mindstorms Robotics kits. Students in grades 4-8 will use the kits to design and program robots to perform a variety of tasks such as moving objects and avoiding obstacles. By working together, students will learn communication and teamwork skills while showcasing their creativity through their designs.

Jennifer Halas of Oldham County Middle School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "There's an App for That - Using iPads to Support Literacy Instruction in Special Education Classroom". This award will be used to purchase 3 iPad minis to help 7th grade students improve reading comprehension and fluency. Having access to this technology on a daily basis will allow the students to independently make progress toward their Individualized Education Plans.

Katie Stephens of Oldham County Middle School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Pumpkin Chunkin'". This award will be used to purchase trebuchet kits, catapult kits and other materials necessary to build devices to "chunk" or throw a pumpkin as far as possible. This engineering project will encourage 7th grade students to apply physics, mathematics and collaboration to design and test their creations. This hands-on activity will build an understanding of what engineers do and the principles involved.

South Oldham Middle

Megan Brocato of South Oldham Middle School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Bridging the Gap to Success for Exceptional Children". This award will be used to purchase 3 iPad minis to help special education students in grades 6-8 improve their math and reading skills. Access to this technology will increase the students' independence. It will also provide accommodation for those students who struggle with spelling and handwriting.

HIGH SCHOOLS

North Oldham High

Lori Lubker of North Oldham High School won a Pyramid Award for her proposal "Anthropological Analysis for Gender and Race of Skulls". This award will be used to purchase a set of six replica human skulls to be studied in the Forensics class. Junior and senior students will have a hands-on opportunity to study, measure and identify key features that distinguish each race and gender. These skulls can be used year after year.

South Oldham High

Adam Watson of South Oldham High School won a Pyramid Award for his proposal "Shakespeare and Star Wars". This award will be used to purchase books and other media to implement a 9th grade mini-unit as an introduction to Shakespeare. The main text for the unit adapts the 1977 movie as if it were presented on the Globe Theater stage of the 1600's. Students who may otherwise be intimidated by the language will be able to concentrate on the style since they will already be familiar with the general story.

Steve Ising of South Oldham High School won a Pyramid Award for his proposal "Hands On" Renewable Energy". This award will be used to purchase five Fisher Scientific Renewable Energy Kits. These kits will provide Science students in grades 9-12 with a hands-on lab activity to build hydroelectric, solar and wind models to generate, store and use electricity. The students will compare and contrast these energy sources and compare them to the use of fossil fuels for efficiency and emitted pollutants. Students will be encouraged to stay abreast of developments with alternate fuel sources and other resources and to realize that this technology may affect them directly and indirectly in the near future.